Taking the Kids out to Eat (aka Why do I Continue to do this to Myself?)

One evening last week, the weather was nice (finally) and the wife had the seemingly excellent suggestion for the six of us to go out to eat and then go to the park afterwards. What was she thinking?!?

We went to a local sandwich place, which was an innocuous choice at first glance. It proved to be anything but that.

I could look past the kids climbing on chairs and tables and built-in furniture. Nothing new here. I could disregard them weaving in-and-out of line, standing with other families, and pulling chip bags down onto the floor. It happens all the time.

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Are You a Word Counter?

This will be a very short post tonight as it’s late and tomorrow is going to be an early Saturday with kids and sports and birthday parties.

So, how closely do you monitor your word count when writing? Is it more important to you with longer works (e.g. novels) vs. short stories and the like?

I am in the process of writing my first novel, and while I have always kept an eye on my word count, I haven’t been hung up on it until recently. But, when I say ‘hung up,’ it’s not in a bad way. I’m not letting my word count drive my work. I won’t judge whether or not my book is a success based on the number of words in it. However, I have been using it as a motivator, and it has been working.

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Craft of Writing: Let the Reader’s Imagination Do the Heavy Lifting

I rarely re-blog (in fact this is my first time), but this gem from The Daily Post contains excellent advice regarding two opposing stances: the thorough descriptive author vs. the author that prefers leaving most of the imagining up the reader. Which type of author are you?

Personally, I like well described settings and scenes, but I also know they can hinder fast-paced action. As a writer, I try to be somewhere in the middle, but if I lean toward one side, it would be the descriptive.

The Daily Post

This is the kind of flowery I can get behind. (Flowery Piano by Andreas (CC BY-SA 2.0) This is the kind of flowery we can get behind. Flowery Piano by Andreas(CC BY-SA 2.0)

In storytelling, description and detail translate what’s in your imagination into scenes and images in the reader’s mind. Can bloated description detract from your work, fill your reader’s brain with too much information, and distract them from the story? The answer is yes. In today’s post we’ll look at how to know when enough is enough.

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